"[Karen Olsen Bruhns and Karen Stothert] argued that discussions of burials at the site, which compared the aggregate of men’s burials to the aggregate of women’s burials, gave a false picture. By asserting that men (in general) received more attention in burial than women (in general), these arguments of male/female status managed to skip over the fact that the single most impressive burial was that of a woman."

— Rosemary Joyce

(Source: ancientbodies.wordpress.com)

openaccessarchaeology:

Open Access Article- Were Unifacial Tools Regularly Hafted by Clovis Foragers in the Lower Great Lakes?
http://www.ohioarchaeology.org/joomla/index.php?option=com_content&task=category&sectionid=10&id=52&Itemid=54

openaccessarchaeology:

Open Access Article- Were Unifacial Tools Regularly Hafted by Clovis Foragers in the Lower Great Lakes?

http://www.ohioarchaeology.org/joomla/index.php?option=com_content&task=category&sectionid=10&id=52&Itemid=54

oosik:


Anasazi Sandals: Museo Nacional de Antropologia, D.F., Mexico
These are some old shoes. If they are in fact Anasazi shoes, they could be upwards of 3,000 years old. The fiber used might be from the yucca plant. It’s weird to see the large strips used when the middle shows some finer work. Compare these to the sandals from the site in New Mexico known as Aztec. Those seem to have the fiber size that is in between these two.
Below is a description of the Anasazi culture. It has nothing to do with shoes:
The Anasazi, whose name means “Ancient people” in Navajo, progressed from being hunter-gatherers to farmers around the year AD 500, a long time after their Hohokam and Mogollon contemporaries. After that moment they copied the Mogollon’s technology to make pottery with rolled clay and build the kivas.
The Anasazi culture extended from the southwest of Colorado and southeast Utah toward the northeast of Arizona and northwest of New Mexico. The most important site was Mesa Verde.
After the year AD 1000, the Anasazi began building systems to transport water in canals and terraces, allowing them to increase agricultural yields and therefore their population. This was the period of their greatest territorial expansion and cultural development. They created roads and paths with signs that served as forms of communication. They carried on trade, especially in turquoise and their characteristic black on white pottery. 
Just like the Hohokam and Mogollon, the Anasazi culture began to decline around the year 1300 and by AD 1600 they had completely abandoned the area. Descendants of the Anasazi who left us archaeological remains live to this day in 18 communities in the same desert region.

oosik:

Anasazi Sandals: Museo Nacional de Antropologia, D.F., Mexico

These are some old shoes. If they are in fact Anasazi shoes, they could be upwards of 3,000 years old. The fiber used might be from the yucca plant. It’s weird to see the large strips used when the middle shows some finer work. Compare these to the sandals from the site in New Mexico known as Aztec. Those seem to have the fiber size that is in between these two.

Below is a description of the Anasazi culture. It has nothing to do with shoes:

The Anasazi, whose name means “Ancient people” in Navajo, progressed from being hunter-gatherers to farmers around the year AD 500, a long time after their Hohokam and Mogollon contemporaries. After that moment they copied the Mogollon’s technology to make pottery with rolled clay and build the kivas.

The Anasazi culture extended from the southwest of Colorado and southeast Utah toward the northeast of Arizona and northwest of New Mexico. The most important site was Mesa Verde.

After the year AD 1000, the Anasazi began building systems to transport water in canals and terraces, allowing them to increase agricultural yields and therefore their population. This was the period of their greatest territorial expansion and cultural development. They created roads and paths with signs that served as forms of communication. They carried on trade, especially in turquoise and their characteristic black on white pottery

Just like the Hohokam and Mogollon, the Anasazi culture began to decline around the year 1300 and by AD 1600 they had completely abandoned the area. Descendants of the Anasazi who left us archaeological remains live to this day in 18 communities in the same desert region.

(via theladygoogle)

thesherd:

Using current technology to reveal life details of 16th century elite archers - from replica longbow studies to skeletal investigations. (via Archers of the Mary Rose Tudor warship : Past Horizons Archaeology)

thesherd:

Using current technology to reveal life details of 16th century elite archers - from replica longbow studies to skeletal investigations. (via Archers of the Mary Rose Tudor warship : Past Horizons Archaeology)

openaccessarchaeology:

New Open Access Article-A Probable Case of Treponematosis Associated with the San FernandoRey de España de Velicatá Mission, Baja California, Mexico
http://www.pcas.org/pdfissues.html

openaccessarchaeology:

New Open Access Article-A Probable Case of Treponematosis Associated with the San FernandoRey de España de Velicatá Mission, Baja California, Mexico

http://www.pcas.org/pdfissues.html

thothofnorth:

Discussion about racism in anthropology; also plenty of good links to other blogposts related to the topic. 

In sum, taken-for-granted practices of racially dividing labor mark anthropology departments as white institutional spaces. They include assigning diversity work to faculty of color, while giving it little value for tenure and promotion, and freeing white faculty from responsibility for it. Informal practices that train students of color for a paraprofessional track reinforce long traditions of treating members of subordinated communities as study subjects and native informants rather than as professional colleagues. The message is that minority anthropologists are not full professionals.

(via praxis-makesperfect-deactivated)

plio-cavedeposits:

Plain of Jars, Laos
Description:Plain of Jars, Site One
Author:Mattun0211

plio-cavedeposits:

Plain of Jars, Laos

Description:Plain of Jars, Site One

Author:Mattun0211

by Rosemary Joyce:

An unprecedented report of colonial Maya paintings from a residence, uncovered under years of overlaying plaster in the highland Guatemalan town, Chajul, provides an extraordinary window into the ways colonized Maya used what the colonial order offered in order to build a world that was not quite what the colonial authorities might have expected.

Images of the newly publicized recovered murals can be seen in a post on the National Geographic website.

One of the archaeologists quoted suggests the images may show a colonial dance, possibly a “conquest dance” (Danza de la Conquista) commemorating the Spanish invasion and conversion of the Maya to Christianity.

ut there is nothing in the murals that parallels known versions of these dances. And the study of indigenous dance-drama actually provides a better candidate for a dance important enough to the residents of Chajul to merit being commemorated in painted murals inside a dwelling. Unfortunately, the dance held in Chajul well into mid-century is no longer practiced, and older sources on it are somewhat fragmentary.

sanitja:

TODAY AT THE CAVEWe have found a new example of Late Talaiotic Pottery!!! Another “Vaso de fondo alto” or “Vaso de doble fondo” that shows different type of decoration from the one found in 2011. These vessels could have been used for incense burning, maybe as part of the Talaiotic funerary ritual.

sanitja:

TODAY AT THE CAVE

We have found a new example of Late Talaiotic Pottery!!! Another “Vaso de fondo alto” or “Vaso de doble fondo” that shows different type of decoration from the one found in 2011. These vessels could have been used for incense burning, maybe as part of the Talaiotic funerary ritual.

(Source: saniserafieldschool)