dolgematki:

albmaduohtasapmelas:

Saebmie - the South Saami area of the pan-Saami area usually referred to as Sápmi
The area where my ancestors have lived and worked for at least 10,000 years has often been described as the last European wilderness, a place untouched by humans. Despite the fact that several proofs of our existence can be found in the so called ‘wild’, Swedish colonialism has relied on a basic history where most of northern Scandinavia could be referred to as a Terra Nullius and any evidence of Saami settlements could be ignored. To this day, when a grave is found on our traditional lands, people react with amazement, as our own histories are repeatedly ignored by the majority. 
‘So people did in fact live here! How fascinating!’
In short, by referring to our lands as ‘wild’, it becomes much easier to question our traditional land claims, which in turn opens up our areas for exploitation by e.g. mining companies. As much of our history is oral, it can easily be dismissed in courts, which is why it is of utmost importance for us to document each and every evidence of human presence on our lands. Not only do we by documenting our lands get a clearer understanding of our own history, at the same time it strengthens us in our identity.
And to help people document our lands, here are some examples of things that may seem like perfectly natural parts of a ‘wilderness’, but which proves that we’ve been in the area for millennia. We cannot be dismissed as ‘having never existed’, just because our interaction with our lands is based on the idea of treating it with the utmost respect, meaning that we wouldn’t fuck it over in the same way as colonisers would.

A collection of bones from slaughtered animals

Graves in Röbäck, Ubmeje, next to where I was born

Petroglyphs in Stornorrfors

A gåetie

Pine tree used as a ladder

Stalo settlements in Vualtjere

A stone oven from Norsjö

All of this.

dolgematki:

albmaduohtasapmelas:

Saebmie - the South Saami area of the pan-Saami area usually referred to as Sápmi

The area where my ancestors have lived and worked for at least 10,000 years has often been described as the last European wilderness, a place untouched by humans. Despite the fact that several proofs of our existence can be found in the so called ‘wild’, Swedish colonialism has relied on a basic history where most of northern Scandinavia could be referred to as a Terra Nullius and any evidence of Saami settlements could be ignored. To this day, when a grave is found on our traditional lands, people react with amazement, as our own histories are repeatedly ignored by the majority. 

‘So people did in fact live here! How fascinating!’

In short, by referring to our lands as ‘wild’, it becomes much easier to question our traditional land claims, which in turn opens up our areas for exploitation by e.g. mining companies. As much of our history is oral, it can easily be dismissed in courts, which is why it is of utmost importance for us to document each and every evidence of human presence on our lands. Not only do we by documenting our lands get a clearer understanding of our own history, at the same time it strengthens us in our identity.

And to help people document our lands, here are some examples of things that may seem like perfectly natural parts of a ‘wilderness’, but which proves that we’ve been in the area for millennia. We cannot be dismissed as ‘having never existed’, just because our interaction with our lands is based on the idea of treating it with the utmost respect, meaning that we wouldn’t fuck it over in the same way as colonisers would.

A collection of bones from slaughtered animals


Graves in Röbäck, Ubmeje, next to where I was born

Petroglyphs in Stornorrfors

A gåetie

Pine tree used as a ladder

Stalo settlements in Vualtjere

A stone oven from Norsjö

All of this.

(via crankyduojar-deactivated2012073)

i’d like to say something about the bones stolen from our graveyards,

dolgematki:

but at this point I’m just overwhelmed by grief and pain. The identities of those whose graves were disturbed will always be unclear because of the way the bones were handled and stored by the oh-so involved white academics. AND THEY MAKE IT ABOUT US NOT KNOWING WHOSE BONES WERE MISSING. And they are still dismissing our demands for apology as “it was the spirit of the time, and you can’t dismiss the science they did was cutting edge back then” and anything else which basically amounts to “OUR IDEAS AND EXPERIMENTS ARE MORE IMPORTANT THAN YOUR LIVES”.

And one white asshole called Mikael Fortelius even had the gall to say something to the effect ofI wouldn’t find it out of place to have my grandma’s bones on the table, but I understand if people feel differently about this”

—well no, you fucking don’t. Because you simply have no concept of the difference between

  1. just taking someone’s grandmother’s bones without permission, displaying them in cabinets and using them to do whatever bullshit racist experiments you wish, and eventually getting her mixed up with the remains of other people and sending back the wrong package, and
  2. consenting to examine YOUR OWN FAMILY’S remains on your terms in ways that are understandable to you and your culture.

And this is because you are a racist, colourblind prick who needs to BURN. FOR ALL ETERNITY.

From another article: “The finding of a burial site means that the area has been inhabited.”

NO FUCKING SHIT, SHERLOCK. WE’RE STILL HERE, YOU WHITE PIECES OF SHIT. You may not be into phrenology any more but you sure as fuck are still RACIST.

^^^Important STATEMENTS which should be acknowledged more often.

[Context: “forgotten” remains, including Saami remains, were found in some boxes in a basement, and a board is deciding whether to rebury, exhibit, study, or “dispose of” the remains.  It looks like the Saami people want the bones to be reburied (I can’t tell whether the article is suggesting that they’re saying “rebury them right now” or “the end result should be reburial but study is okay first”) but the bones may not be reburied because the provenance of some is questionable?  The hedgey language is because I don’t speak Finnish and google translate is not being very helpful here, so I’m not entirely sure I understand the specifics of what the article says.  I wish I knew more about this.  In some contexts, some kinds of analyses might be helpful to solve this problem, but I doubt those are the analyses the scientists want to do, and I doubt that the ones they do want to do would be much help here.]

(via crankyduojar-deactivated2012073)