canadianarchaeology:

Happy Mother’s Day! In honour of Mother’s Day, here are some examples of mothering in Canadian history: juvenile vessel fragments from the McNair Site; a mid-fifteenth century ancestral Wendat village site found in Vaughan, Ontario.

Archaeologists call these finds ‘juvenile vessels’ because they are attempts at pot-making by children - a learning process involving children partaking in adult activities. We know through the historic records that women, and specifically mothers, aunts and grandmothers, were the ones that taught children to make vessels. In general, juvenile ceramic assemblages include a great variety of decorative motifs and techniques. You can see in the fragments below that, based on the pot manufacture and decoration, young potters tended to copy adult pot styles. In some cases, even distinct types can be recognized among juvenile vessels.

Small versions of ceramics were made by young girls that imitate the style of the full size pots. When a young woman became more skilled at pottery, she would make smaller pots first, and eventually make the impressive full size pots that her elders made.

(Source)

(via )

openaccessarchaeology:

Open Access Article- Pregnancy and Field Archaeology
http://www.assemblage.group.shef.ac.uk/features/discussion-forum/173-pregnancy-and-field-archaeology

Don’t underestimate Viking women

archaeologicalnews:

image

The status of Viking women may be underestimated due to the way we interpret burial findings.

“To assume that Viking men were ranked above women is to impose modern values on the past, which would be misleading,” cautions Marianne Moen. She has been studying how women’s status and power is expressed through Viking burial findings. Her master’s thesis The Gendered Landscape argues that viking gender roles may have been more complex than we assume.

Exploring new perspectives of Viking society is a theme which also will be the focus of the forthcoming Viking Worlds conference in March 2013, where Moen is a member of the organising committee. Read more.

partysoft:

cruisecontrolforcool:

archaeologicalnews:

A skeleton uncovered north of Vienna is forcing archaeologists to take a fresh look at prehistoric gender roles after it appeared to be that of a female fine metal worker - a profession that was previously thought to have been carried out exclusively by men.

The Museum of Ancient History in Lower Austria says the grave originates from the Bronze Age around 2,000 years before the birth of Christ, and that the bones belonged to a woman who would have been aged between 45 and 60.

The museum says tools used to make metal ornaments were also found in the grave at Geitzendorf Northwest of Vienna, leading to the conclusion that it was that of a female fine metal worker who had been given the items to take with her into the afterlife.

The items included an anvil, hammers and flint chisels as well as some small items of dress jewellery that may well have been made by the woman herself. Read more.

no shit you think women would let dudes make all the jewelry

SHOCKING DISCOVERY: WOMEN DID THINGS

(via partyspoopy)

gwebarchaeology:

infoneer-pulse:
Unknown language found stamped in ancient clay tablet
In deciphering the tablet seen above, John MacGinnis of the University of Cambridge found that many of the names on the list are not from any currently known ancient language. “One or two are actually Assyrian and a few more may belong to other known languages of the period, such as Luwian or Hurrian,” he says, “but the great majority belong to a previously unidentified language.”
» via New Scientist

gwebarchaeology:

infoneer-pulse:

Unknown language found stamped in ancient clay tablet

In deciphering the tablet seen above, John MacGinnis of the University of Cambridge found that many of the names on the list are not from any currently known ancient language. “One or two are actually Assyrian and a few more may belong to other known languages of the period, such as Luwian or Hurrian,” he says, “but the great majority belong to a previously unidentified language.”

» via New Scientist

akalle:

Female Gladiators? Tantalizing New Evidence From Ancient Rome.

The roughly 2,000-year-old artwork, which resides at the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbein in Hamburg, shows a bare-chested woman in a loincloth brandishing a scythe-like object in her left hand.

Manas believes the woman is holding a sica, a short, curved sword associated with a type of gladiator known as a thraex, or Thracian. Thraexes typically fought in plumed helmets, with small shields and metal leg guards called greaves. Their unarmored backs were particularly vulnerable—and were likely ripe targets for sica.

akalle:

The roughly 2,000-year-old artwork, which resides at the Museum für Kunst und Gewerbein in Hamburg, shows a bare-chested woman in a loincloth brandishing a scythe-like object in her left hand.

gwebarchaeology:

““The first person [the Spanish] met was a woman,” Patel said, “The first thing they thought was, What kind of a [people] would leave a woman to make first contact?’ They refused to talk with her, so a man had to come and deal with them.””

New research shows ancient Maya women were powerful leaders - Archeaology Daily (via goodbyeolepaint)

Also from the article:

"One of the great things about archaeological research is that it can show us how different life was in the past and how it is in the future," [Cynthia Robin, professor of anthropology at Northwestern University] said. "So if we assume that gender relations were always the same then we’re just kind of justifying the inequalities that exist today."

And from a different article on the topic:

"Women lost their status and authority with the advent of colonialism," [Patel] said. "The Spaniards didn’t understand female leaders and they squashed pagan religions. They branded women healers and diviners as witches. They talked about them as improper women who spoke for their men.

Our society is so patriarchal, and archaeologists often don’t realize how that affects the way they look at the past. What we say about the past is important to the people who live there today. It’s political how you talk about people in the past. If you say women are subjugated today because they always have been, that’s a way of justifying what’s happening today. If you can show that was not true, that it happened because of colonialism, there is opportunity for new interpretations of history and for change to occur.”

rocks-n-bones:

Hetty Goldman was one of the great figures of archaeology in the first half of the  twentieth century.  Through her systematic and innovative excavation  techniques, her seminal publications, her pioneering work on ancient  Greek sites in Turkey, and her role in mentoring the talented young  women archaeologists who came after her, Goldman played a critical part  in opening the field for women.  The archaeology profession recognized  her accomplishments in 1966 by awarding her the Gold Medal of the  American Institute of Archaeology for Distinguished Archaeological  Achievement, only the second person ever to receive this prestigious  honor.

rocks-n-bones:

Hetty Goldman was one of the great figures of archaeology in the first half of the twentieth century. Through her systematic and innovative excavation techniques, her seminal publications, her pioneering work on ancient Greek sites in Turkey, and her role in mentoring the talented young women archaeologists who came after her, Goldman played a critical part in opening the field for women. The archaeology profession recognized her accomplishments in 1966 by awarding her the Gold Medal of the American Institute of Archaeology for Distinguished Archaeological Achievement, only the second person ever to receive this prestigious honor.

(via rocks-n-bones-deactivated201203)